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Desert Scenery
{thumb} Death Valley 1 -- 2006.02.06
Death Valley, California is lowest, hottest, driest location in North America. It is 282 ft (86 m) below sea level, with nearby mountains over 11,000 ft (3353 m) high.[=] Credits: Photo by Sae, 2006.02.06. Copyright Hebus.Com 2006.
{thumb} Death Valley 2 -- 2006.02.06
Death Valley National Park comprises more than 3.3 million acres (1.3 million hectares) of spectacular desert scenery, rare desert wildlife, complex geology, undisturbed wilderness and sites of historical interest.[=] Credits: Photo by Sae, 2006.02.06. Copyright Hebus.Com 2006.
{thumb} Death Valley 3 -- 2006.02.08
Snow-capped mountains border the desert.[=] Credits: Photo by Sae, 2006.02.08. Copyright Hebus.Com 2001.
{thumb} Southeast Oregon -- 2006.01.18
People who live in the sheltered nooks the desert provides share a yearning for spareness, a dread of congestion, and an urge to be unencumbered by just about everything except space and weather.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2002.11.27. Photo by Sarah Leen, 1996. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2002.
{thumb} Malheur -- 2005.12.28
The sparsely settled southeast region of Oregon was appropriately named Malheur (French for "misfortune") by trappers because of its bleak terrain.[=] Credits: Photo by Sarah Leen, 1996. Copyright: National Geographic Society, 2005.
{thumb} Malheur Ducks -- 2006.01.19
In Malheur, Oregon lakes appear and disappear, and the only break from silence may be the honking of snow geese or a distant coyote yelping into the wind.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2002.09.04. Photo by Sarah Leen, 1996. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2002.
{thumb} Dutton Point Grand Canyon -- 2006.01.21
Dutton Point on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, a favorite viewpoint, but only one of many.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2002.01.24. Photo by Bruce Dale, 1993. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2002.
{thumb} Monument Valley -- 2003.09.17
Remnants of volcanic vents dot the Utah desert beneath the vast western skies.[=] Credits: Sorry, I've lost the source for the background image.
{thumb} Canyonlands NP -- 2005.12.30
These spires, known as the Needles, in Utah's Canyonlands National Park, are red and white banded sandstone, some reaching 300 ft (91 m) in height.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2005.06.30. Photo by James P. Blair, 1992. Copyright: National Geographic Society, 2005.
{thumb} Sand Dunes National Monument -- 2006.01.21
A 1964 Federal act protects 9.1 million acres of wilderness, areas "where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain."[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2001.11.26. Photo by Peter Essick, 1997. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2001.
{thumb} Lagoon -- 2006.02.15
Sun-burnished waters from a lagoon in Loango National Park, Gabon, Africa, after its banks suddenly burst, pour across sand flats toward the sea.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2006.02.13. Photo by Michael K. Nichols, 2003. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2006.
{thumb} Chad -- 2005.12.28
Rocky skylines and dunes red with iron oxide make for a Martian landscape in northern Chad. Evidence of the Sahara's ancient seas and rivers, sandstone pinnacles were eroded by rainfall.[=] Credits: Photo by George Steinmetz, 1998. Copyright: National Geographic Society, 2005.
{thumb} Saudi Sand Dune -- 2006.01.23
A man walks across a large sand dune in Saudi Arabia's Empty Quarter.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2001.07.16. Photo by Thomas J. Abercrombie, 1972. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2001.
{thumb} Wadi Rum Jordan -- 2006.01.17
Lawrence of Arabia on the Wadi Rum desert: "Our little caravan grew self-conscious, and fell dead quiet, afraid and ashamed to flaunt its smallness in the presence of the stupendous hills."[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2003.02.02. Photo by Annie Griffiths Belt, 1996. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2003.
{thumb} Dunes Algeria -- 2006.01.18
These 150 ft (46 m) waves flow across the Erg Bourarhet region. Sand covers less than a fifth of the vast Sahara; the rest is a harsh world of gravel plains, stark mountains, and dry salt lakes.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2002.11.14. Photo by Thomas J. Abercrombie, 1972. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2002.
{thumb} Nyae Nyae -- 2006.03.04
Carrying bows and arrows, Bushmen walk across a salt pan in Nyae Nyae Conservancy in Namibia.[=] Credits: NGPOD, no date. Photo by Chris Johns, no date. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2006.
{thumb} Tenere Desert -- 2006.03.04
Winds that sweep across Niger's Tenere desert can create sand dunes a thousand ft (305 m) high.[=] Credits: NGPOD, no date. Photo by George Steinmetz, no date. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2006.
{thumb} Wilpena Pound -- 2005.12.30
Australia. The rock basin known as Wilpena Pound was carved from ancient mountains by erosion. The high walls of rock are weather-resistant quartzite.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2005.06.15. Photo by O. Louis Mazzatenta, 1996. Copyright: National Geographic Society, 2005.
{thumb} Great Sandy Desert -- 2006.01.20
The hot, dry Balgo Hills landscape hides underground water, supporting a green stream of vegetation that drains into the desert and provides food.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2002.03.19. Photo by Sam Abell, 1990. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2002.
{thumb} Antarctic Desert -- 2006.01.21
More like Mars than Earth, Antarctica's Dry Valleys draw scientists to study primitive life-forms and to look through the window that this changeless landscape opens.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2001.08.28. Photo by Maria Stenzel, 1998. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2001.
{thumb} Beacon Valley -- 2006.01.30
A giant jigsaw puzzle of stone and soil shaped by frost paves Beacon Valley. The age of volcanic ash here shows little has changed in millions of years.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2001.04.30. Photo by Maria Stenzel, 1998. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2001.
{thumb} Devon Island Canada -- 2006.01.30
Light snow and the otherworldly glow of an Arctic summer night lend an alien aura to Haughton Crater -- similar to craters on Mars -- on Canada's Devon Island.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2001.05.07. Photo by Peter Essick, 1999. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2001.
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